Short Stop

Gaffeys

I almost got run over on Patriots’ Day. Ironically, right in front of Gaffey’s Funeral Home. Not by Paul Revere, although he was the last to pass by before the incident, a few minutes before. It was the first car to drive down First Street after the road was opened to traffic following the ceremony. I never saw it coming when I was crossing the street. It screeched to a stop.

Earlier, I listened to Paul Revere (depicted in full costume by a member of the National Lancers) as he spoke to the crowd gathered in front of Gaffey’s. Next, the Mayor of Medford spoke from the same podium. “This is my first Patriots’ Day as mayor. I hope it’s the first of many!” she said. Then the mayor introduced two school children who each read half of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere. There were about a hundred of us gathered around to honor this

Massachusetts state holiday marking the Battles of Lexington and Concord. Following the poem, Paul Revere mounted his horse and headed for Arlington, then Lexington and Concord. We all know what he was up to. Behind the horse, many went into the funeral home for complimentary wrap sandwiches, bags of chips and sodas. It was pure Americana and I was lucky to stumble upon it on a drawing day.

In 1775, this house was the home of Captain Issac Hall, a rum merchant, and it was an important stop on Paul Revere’s ride. Hall was the leader of the Medford Minutemen. In Revere’s own account, he wrote, “I went through Medford over the bridge and up to Menotomy. In Medford I waked the Captain of the Minute Men, and after that, I alarmed almost every house till I got to Lexington.” Hall and his men saw battle with the Redcoats the next day, and fought again in the Battle of Bunker Hill, a few months later. The tall house stands as the oldest in historic Medford Square.

As I sat and drew—watching the clean-up crew from the city lift the speaker’s podium away—I attracted a couple of visitors. First came a woman who said she was an artist, too. She’s the one who tipped me off to the free lunch inside the funeral home. Next came an older couple. The man asked if I was “doing that for someone?” I said, “No, I’m just working for myself.” He then said, “When I used to do that, I noticed that the cars came in threes.” Then his wife turned to her partner and said firmly “He’s drawing a picture!” “Oh!” said the man, “that’s more interesting!” I told him that I found his “cars come in threes” observation pretty interesting, and they walked away. The whole day was interesting. I’m glad I survived it.

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One thought on “Short Stop

  1. I can’t think of a better way to spend Patriot’s Day, Fred! That spot has seen a lot of history made. Thanks for sharing.

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