Paul Revere’s House

Paul Revere House

If there was a starting line for Paul Revere’s Ride, perhaps it would be the threshold of his own home in North Square, in Boston’s North End. It’s from there that Revere’s historic night was launched. After two lanterns were hung in the Old North Church he hustled home for his riding boots, then raced out again, at first by foot, then by boat, and then by horse, to warn the colonists that the Regulars (the British) were coming.

The Paul Revere House is the oldest house in downtown Boston, built in 1680. Revere didn’t always live there, but he did at the time of his famous ride, and that’s why it survived until today. Revere’s great-grandson, John P. Reynolds Jr. purchased the house in 1902, and not long after, the building was restored and turned into a museum. Paul Revere moved from here in the 1780’s and sold it around 1800. Between Revere’s time and ours, the house took on many roles:  including a home for wayward sailors, a tenement house, and a host for shops on the first floor. And with the changes of use, came changes to the facade. The house is almost unrecognizable in old photographs.

For its restoration, the clock was turned back to the years before Paul Revere lived there, to match the its surviving 17th Century interior structure. So, while Revere’s home had a third floor of windows facing the street, what we see now is the earlier facade, featuring more roof.

Before this house was built, the famous early Bostonians, Increase and Cotton Mather lived at this location in what was a then parsonage for the Second Church of Boston. Both Mathers became famously entangled in the Salem Witch Trials.

While drawing across the street from the Paul Revere House on a raw but sunny Saturday morning in March, I watched visitors line up for the opening of the museum. Groups of foreign tourists made their stops as part of a journey along the Freedom Trail. Germans, Chinese and Scottish folks said hello. At one point, a tour of joggers stopped by. They took a brief break to stretch and hydrate while their heavy-breathing guide blabbed about the house. Then off they went, running the same streets that Paul Revere hustled down on his momentous night.

 

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